9/30/2011

New Sentencing Law Goes Into Effect Friday




Ohio's new sentencing reform law, which is designed to help reduce the state's prison population, will take effect Friday.

Governor John Kasich signed the bill in June that will put fewer non-violent offenders behind bars.

Currently, Ohio prisons hold 50,000 inmates, which is about 30 percent over what they are designed to hold.

"It also treats fourth- and fifth-degree felonies in a way where it will allow more community control sanctions, and will lessen, in theory and probably practice, the number of individuals that are non-violent that are sent to prison," said Prosecutor Dennis Watkins.

State officials said the new bill is designed to save taxpayers millions and will allow inmates to serve more time in community based centers instead of more expensive state prisons.

"You don't know, you have to go day by day and see what that impact is going to be," Trumbull County Sheriff Tom Altiere said.

The sentencing reform law also makes changes in the juvenile justice system, which many officials said are positive ones that have already been in place locally.

"The provisions House Bill 86 provide is that each case will be individually reviewed and looked at and determined to be what fits not only the crime, but the student, and the best way of rehabilitation and most appropriate use of public funidng," said Mahoning County Juvenile Judge Theresa Dellick.

It also creates an mental health juvenile justice task force.


Ohio's new sentencing reform law, which is designed to help reduce the state's prison population, will take effect Friday.

Governor John Kasich signed the bill in June that will put fewer non-violent offenders behind bars.

Currently, Ohio prisons hold 50,000 inmates, which is about 30 percent over what they are designed to hold.

"It also treats fourth- and fifth-degree felonies in a way where it will allow more community control sanctions, and will lessen, in theory and probably practice, the number of individuals that are non-violent that are sent to prison," said Prosecutor Dennis Watkins.

State officials said the new bill is designed to save taxpayers millions and will allow inmates to serve more time in community based centers instead of more expensive state prisons.

"You don't know, you have to go day by day and see what that impact is going to be," Trumbull County Sheriff Tom Altiere said.

The sentencing reform law also makes changes in the juvenile justice system, which many officials said are positive ones that have already been in place locally.

"The provisions House Bill 86 provide is that each case will be individually reviewed and looked at and determined to be what fits not only the crime, but the student, and the best way of rehabilitation and most appropriate use of public funidng," said Mahoning County Juvenile Judge Theresa Dellick.

It also creates an mental health juvenile justice task force.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Note: Only a member of this blog may post a comment.

If I Get Out Alive - Children Sentenced to Adult Prison - Press Play to Listen

Broken on all sides

Popular Posts

There was an error in this gadget